TRB (Transportation Research Board) Bibliography Style Updated for Word 2013/2016

Word 2016 Reference Tab

Seven years ago, I released a TRB (Transportation Research Board) Bibliography Style for Word 2010. In the years since, that post has proved to be one of my most popular. However, after the initial project I needed it for, I haven’t needed it again, and so it just let it lie. Then, internal changes in Word made the style un-usable with the 2013 release. I was disappointed, but unsure of how to fix it.

So imagine my delight last week to receive an email, out of the blue, from Maggie McNamara saying that she’d found a way to update the Bibiliography style for Word 2013! As a bonus, she’s also added DOI support (which I’d never heard of when I first created the style).

Installation

This updated version should work with all versions of Word after 2007 (although I haven’t personally been able to test them all). One thing that does change between Word versions is where to put the XSL file:

Word 2007 (Windows)
<winword.exe directory>\Bibliography\Style
Word 2010 (Windows)
<winword.exe directory>\Bibliography\Style
Word 2010 (32 bit systems) (Windows)
%programfiles%\Microsoft Office\Office14\Bibliography\Style
Word 2016 and Office 365 (Windows)
C:\Users\<currentusername>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Bibliography\Style, or %AppData%\Microsoft\Templates\LiveContent\15\Managed\Word Document Bibliography Styles
Word 2008 and Word 2011 (Mac OS)
To use the bibliography styles, right-click on Microsoft Word 2008 and select show package contents. Put the files in Contents/Resources/Style/. On most Macs with Microsoft Word 2008 this will be /Applications/Microsoft Office 2008/Microsoft Word.app/Contents/Resources/Style/
Word 2016 for Mac (version 15.17.0 and up)
/Library/AppSupport/Microsoft/Office365/Citations/
Office 365 (Mas OS)
/Applications/Microsoft Word.app/Contents/Resources/Style

Example Output

In-text references are numeric, based on reference order.

Repeated references reuse the original number.

… Different pedestrian behaviour is associated not only with different physical characteristics but also the differing purpose of pedestrians (1, 2). Studies have been carried out for crowds associated with transportation systems (3, 4, 5), sporting and general spectator occasions (6), holy sites (7, 8), political demonstrations (9), and fire escapes (10).

The bibliography output is as follows:

  1. Polus, A., J.L. Schofer, and A. Ushpi. Pedestrian flow and level of service. Journal of Transportation Engineering Proceedings, ASCE, Vol. 109, 1983, pp. 46-57.

  2. Toshiyuki, A. Prediction system of passenger flow, in Engineering for Crowd Safety, Smith, R.A., and J.F. Dickie. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1993, pp. 249-258.

  3. Smith, R.A., and J.F. Dickie. Engineering for Crowd Safety. Amsterdam, 1993.

  4. Tanaka, T. A study for performance based design of means of escape in fire, in Fire Safety Science — Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium, Cox, G., and B. Langford. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1991, pp. 729-738.

  5. Wikipedia contributors. List of metro systems. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, June 17, 2010. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_metro_systems&oldid=368658114. Accessed June 17, 2010.

Known Issues

  • in Word 2016, it lists the style as First Edition, and I haven’t figured out how to change this yet.

Download

TRB Bibliography format for Word 2007/2010/2013/2016 (right-click and select “Save Link As…”)

Thanks again Maggie for the update!

Links

  • Original Release Post (July 7, 2010)
  • BibWord source code — This is the original project for creating custom Bibliography styles for Word. If you need a style other than TRB and the built-in styles, this may provide a starting point for you to build your own custom style.

Other posts



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