Birkenhead’s of Backford

I have been continuing my research of the Bunbury line. For the 18th century and earlier, Burke’s Peerage has proved incredibly useful. As Burke’s is serves mainly for showing how someone inherited their title or lands, it tends to be patrilineal (meaning descent is calculated through men). However, the wives are often well noted, including the wife’s father. Such is the link between the Bunbury’s and the Birkenhead’s.

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Genealogy is Up!

Many years ago when I first bought minchin.ca, I thought it would be neat to put my genealogy online. This stemmed, in part, from the fact that most of the genealogy research I was doing was online. But it’s taken a long time to figure out how to generate the webpages a way I wanted. I wanted a website that I could update without the links changing, and a way to hide the information about living people. Just this last week I found Adam, an online service hosted by Tim Forsythe, that will do that for me. So now my genealogy is up! Check it out at minchin.ca/genealogy/.

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Livingstone’s Birthplace (Postcard) — Photo 33 — Project 365

Livingstone’s Birthplace (Postcard) — Photo 33 — Project 365
Still with the Family History theme, I also came across this postcard sent to my 2nd Great-Grandfather by his sister. It speaks to a different era, when people had more connections to the home country and so would go for months to visit the country and family. The note on the back (“This is a real photograph”) speaks to the state of the art of photography — still complicated and expensive. The other thing that amazes me is how simple the address is. All in all, it’s an interesting peak into the past.

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The Origins of the Sinnamon Family — Photo 32 — Project 365

The Origins of the Sinnamon Family — Photo 32 — Project 365

When I was home to my parents’ last time, I was going through some old boxes and found this. The album must be nearly as old as I am. The writing is in my grandma’s own hand, which is fitting because it was her that carried Sinnamon as a maiden name. The passage reads:

The Sinnamons are descendants from the family of St. Amond who were Huguenots (French Protestants) in Europe. In the 16th and 17th century [sic] when the Huguenots were persecuted, some of them fled to the northern part of Ireland for refuge. At that time, the St. Amonds were illiterate. Later, when they learned to read and write, the name was written down as SINNAMON

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